Vivian Vazquez Irizarry

  • rsvped for Puerto Rican New Yorkers 2021-05-21 12:34:02 -0400

    Puerto Rican New Yorkers:
    Workers, Unions and Politics in the Struggle for a Better Life, 1910s-1960s

     

     

    Puerto Ricans who migrated to New York joined one of the largest concentrations of urban wage workers in the world. Most migrants were already familiar with the routines and conditions of wage work while others had to adjust to the challenges of a highly developed industrial city where both exploitation as well as opportunities for better wages abounded. Work, leisure, family life and politics consumed most of their energies, but in New York the complexity of urban, class, racial and ethnic contexts could be daunting and required a myriad of adjustments. The city offered opportunities for solidarity and new forms of organization and improvement as well as unpredictable risks and new problems. This exhibit reunites a series of blogs that will introduce many of the rich contexts in which Puerto Rican New Yorkers engaged with larger movements and struggles from the 1910s to the 1970s. The mosaic represented here includes only some of the stories.

    Author: Aldo Lauria Santiago, Professor, Latino and Caribbean Studies and History Departments, School of Arts and Sciences, Rutgers University

    Commentator: Virginia Sanchez-Korrol, Professor Emerita, Department of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies at Brooklyn College, CUNY

    Bios

    Aldo A. Lauria Santiago, Professor of Caribbean, Latin American and US Latino History, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ  

    Aldo A. Lauria Santiago was born in Chicago and grew up in Puerto Rico. His mother was one of the first women from Puerto Rico to be admitted to the Ph.D. in Anthropology at Columbia and the University of Chicago. His dad came from the Italian American Bronx in the 1950s and discovered Puerto Rico; also became an anthropologist.  Dr. Lauria Santiago works as a Professor in the Department of Latino and Caribbean Studies and the Department of History at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. At Rutgers University, Lauria Santiago had a joint appointment between the Department of Puerto Rican and Hispanic Caribbean Studies and the Department of History, where he spent seven years as chair where he led the reconstruction of the department of what is now the Department of Latino and Caribbean Studies.   He is a historian of Central America, Mexico, the Caribbean and Latinos in the US. He specializes in peasant and working class history, revolution, ethnicity and race. He went to college at Princeton University and received his MA at NYU and Ph.D. at the University of Chicago.  He trained as a Mexicanist at The University of Chicago but began his career as a historian of El Salvador. He has published books and articles on El Salvador and formed part of a group of historians that helped develop Central American historiography during the conflicted but revolutionary decade of the 1980s.  Since 2008 he turned to do research on the Puerto Rican community in New York. With Lorrin Thomas, he published Rethinking the Struggle for Puerto Rican Rights in 2018. His research, on which the Centro essays are based, will be published in two or three books, the first of which is under contract with the University of North Carolina Press and should be published in 2022.  Contact: [email protected]

    Dr. Virginia Sanchez Korrol Professor Emerita, Department of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies at Brooklyn College, CUNY
    Virginia is Professor Emerita at the Department of Puerto Rican and Latino Studies, Brooklyn College, CUNY. Dr. Sanchez Korrol writes about the Puerto Rican experience in the United States. Among her extensive publications, she authored From Colonia to Community: The History of Puerto Ricans in New York City, and co-edited Latinas in the United States: A Historical Encyclopedia. Recipient of the Herbert H. Lehman Prize for Distinguished Contributions to New York History, 2020, she serves as historical consultant to media projects, government and cultural institutions. She is the co-editor of Puerto Rican Studies in CUNY: The First 50 Years (forthcoming 2021). Contact: [email protected], [email protected]

     

     

    Wednesday, May 26, 2021 | 5:00 PM EST | 4:00 PM CST

     

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  • rsvped +1 for Discussion Series: Music 2021-05-03 16:35:57 -0400

    Puerto Rican Heritage Cultural Ambassador Program Discussion Series : Music

    May 4, 2021
    12pm

    The Puerto Rican Heritage Cultural Ambassador Program Presents:

    Screening of Puerto Rican Voices film shorts and discussion with folklorist Elena Martine

     


    Join us for a conversation with Elena Martinez, folklorist for CityLore. Elena will discuss the vast contributions of Puerto Ricans to the musical landscape of the United States and beyond. She will discuss the role of music in the migration experience, including evolving identities, and the ways in which musical traditions, like bomba, have been maintained in diaspora communities. Three segments from Centro’s award-winning Puerto Rican Voices television series will be screened:

    Semilla Cultural - Runtime 8:08
    Semilla Cultural is a non-profit organization developing and cultivating a community that embraces Puerto Rican culture and arts in the Washington DC, Maryland and Virginia region.

    Eguie Castrillo, Celebrated Percussionist and Associate Professor at Berklee College of Music, Boston, MA – Runtime: 8:42
    Eguie Castrillo performed with Tito Puente, Steve Winwood, Michael Brecker, Ruben Blades, United Nation Orchestra, Paquito D'Rivera, Michel Camilo, KC and the Sunshine Band, Dave Valentin, and Giovanni Hidalgo. He toured with the Arturo Sandoval Band; recordings include Hot House with Arturo Sandoval, The Latin Train with Arturo Sandoval, soundtrack for The Perez Family for MGM, Get Down Live! with KC and the Sunshine Band, and A GRP Celebration of the Songs of the Beatles.

    Miguel Zenón, Multiple Grammy Nominee - Runtime: 9:01
    Widely considered as one of the most groundbreaking and influential saxophonists of his generation, he has also developed a unique voice as a composer and as a conceptualist, concentrating his efforts on perfecting a fine mix between Latin American Folkloric Music and Jazz.


    Speaker:

    Elena Martinez

     

    About Elena Martinez

    Elena Martínez is the Co-Artistic Director of the Bronx Music Heritage Center and a Folklorist at City Lore. Her work at City Lore has included getting Casa Amadeo (the longest continually-run Latin music store in NYC) nominated to the National Register of Historic Places (the first nomination relating to the Puerto Rican experience on the mainland); and nominated master Puerto Rican lacemaker (the art of mundillo) Rosa Elena Egipciaco for a NEA National Heritage Award. <More>

     

     

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  • rsvped for Webinar: Post-Disaster Recovery 2021-01-26 12:14:26 -0500

    Webinar: Post-Disaster Recovery in Puerto Rico and Local Participation


    Wednesday, February 3rd at 3:00 PM EST/4:00 AST

     


    Puerto Rico has suffered the compounded effects of multiple disasters since the devastating impacts of Hurricanes Irma and Maria in September 2017. At the end of 2019, the island was impacted with recurrent seismic activity in the southwest region, including a magnitude 6.4 earthquake on January 7, 2020. In early 2020, the current COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting health crises induced yet another economic contraction. All these disasters are underscored by a crushing debt crisis and a federally mandated austerity regime since 2016. Multiple natural disasters have exacerbated vulnerability and poverty; and public energy, telecommunications, water, health, and transportation systems have deteriorated and become even more vulnerable, causing systematic failures in social safety nets.

    centro_journal_cover_fall_2020_n3_1_.png

    Post-disaster federal funding for economic recovery offers Puerto Rico a unique window of opportunity to restore its economy and infrastructure in a more resilient fashion while strengthening the nonprofit sector capacity for community planning, housing development and neighborhood revitalization. However, such an opportunity is contingent on implementing a comprehensive strategy for reforming public policy to encourage and support nonprofit developers participation in reconstruction programs, building industry capacity by strengthening intermediaries and CDCs, encouraging intra-industry partnerships and collaborations, and providing professional development for economic recovery.

    Join us Wednesday, February 3rd at 3:00 PM EST/4:00 AST for a webinar to discuss the collection of studies included in Fall 2020 special volume of the Centro Journal showing evidence of how post disaster recovery is progressing in Puerto Rico, and the challenges and opportunities for local participation in reconstruction programs.



    Event Cosponsors:

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    This webinar is cosponsored by
    The National Puerto Rican Agenda, National Puerto Rican Student Coalition, IdeaComún,
    Puerto Rican Student Association at NYU, Despierta Boricua at Yale, and Urbana Planifica

     


    Presenters:

    Entrepreneurial Dynamics in Puerto Rico Before and After Hurricane María
    Marinés Aponte, Professor, Business Administration Department at Universidad de Puerto Rico, Recinto de Río Piedras

    Centros de Apoyo Mutuo: reconfigurando la asistencia en tiempos de desastre
    Roberto Vélez-Vélez, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, SUNY at New Paltz

    Impact of Hurricane María to the Civic Sector: A Profile of Non-Profits in Puerto Rico
    Ivis García Zambrana, Assistant Professor, City & Metropolitan Planning, University of Utah

    Puerto Rico Community Development Industry’s Capacity for Disaster Recovery
    Edwin Meléndez, Director of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies and Professor of Urban Policy and Planning, Hunter College

    What is Possible? Policy Options for Long-term Disaster Recovery in Puerto Rico
    Ariam L. Torres Cordero, Centro Researcher and doctoral student in Urban Planning (DSUP) at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

    Presenter bios can be found at this link: https://centropr.hunter.cuny.edu/education/instructores

     

    Tools

    Journal Abstract: CENTRO_Abstract_Fall2020.pdf
    Journal Intro: CENTRO_Intro_Fall2020.pdf

    A Profile of Non-Profits and Recovery PPP (PDF) by Ivis Garcia Zambrana


     

    CENTRO: Journal Special Issue: Post-Disaster Recovery in Puerto Rico and Local Participation is available here http://www.centropr-store.com/centro-journal-vol-xxxii-no-3-fall-2020/

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