Aurora Flores

  • Webinar
    Legislative Redistricting: Challenges to Hispanic Congressional Representation in New York State, 2021

    Congressional Redistricting in New York State (Full Webinar)

    This webinar will introduce participants to the process and challenges New Yorkers, particularly Hispanics, will face in the upcoming redistricting of congressional districts that takes place every ten years. Centro: the Center for Puerto Rican Studies, the leading academic research institute dedicated to the study of the Puerto Rican experience in the United States, and the largest and oldest Latino Studies research institute on the East Coast, along with LatinoJustice-PRLDEF, the premier Latino public interest law practice and leading legal advocacy and human and civil right Hispanic organization on the East Coast, will describe what Hispanics can expect from the reapportionment and redistricting process taking place in 2021, discuss the findings of a new research brief from Centro on the subject, and learn how Hispanics can become actively involved in the process of redrawing political boundaries in New York State.

    Joining this discussion will be the Honorable Robert Rodríguez, member of the New York State Assembly and co-chair of the New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment, and Dr. Ivelisse Cuevas-Molina, Assistant Professor at Fordham University and member of the New York Independent Redistricting Commission, charged with redrawing legislative districts in the state.

    Carlos Vagas Ramos Presentation

    Juan Cartagena Presentation

    Fulvia Vargas-De Leon Presentation

    Discussion with the Honorable Robert Rodríguez, and Ivelisse Cuevas-Molina

     

    Redistricting 2020: Challenges to Hispanic Congressional Representation in New York State
    by Carlos Vargas-Ramos

    The process of apportioning political power in the United is about to begin. New York Latino U.S. representatives, and specifically Puerto Rican representatives, are vulnerable to losing their congressional seats in the upcoming process of congressional reapportionment and redistricting. This brief presents an analysis of population change at the state, county and congressional district levels to illustrate the changes to come in the process of congressional reapportionment and redistricting as it affects federal political representation in New York State. New York gained population between decades, but at a very low rate. New York gained population because of the sustained growth of the state’s Hispanic population, which countered the declining population of the state, particularly the decreasing non-Hispanic white population.

     

    Presenters

    https:/centropr.hunter.cuny.edu/sites/default/files/events_2021/carlos_vargas.jpg
    Carlos Vargas-Ramos, Director of Public Policy and Development at the Center for Puerto Rican Studies, Hunter College (CUNY), centropr.hunter.cuny.edu;
     

    Lucia Gomez, Political Director at NYC Central Labor Council - AFL-CIO; and Executive Director of LA Fuente A Tri-State Worker & Community Fund Inc, www.nycclc.org; [email protected] 201-988-8824
     

    Juan Cartagena, President & General Counsel at LatinoJustice PRLDEF, www.latinojustice.org/en;  https://www.latinojustice.org/en/form/contact-us
     

    Fulvia Vargas-De Leon, Associate Counsel at LatinoJustice PRLDEF, https://www.latinojustice.org/en; https://www.latinojustice.org/en/form/contact-us
     

    New York State Assembly member Robert J. Rodriguez, Co-Chair of the NYS Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment, latfor.state.ny.us; [email protected]
     

    Ivelisse Cuevas-Molina, New York Independent Redistricting Commission, www.ivelissecuevas.com/research   
     
    Professional Bios
     
    Carlos Vargas-Ramos is the Center for Puerto Rican Studies’s Director for Public Policy, External and Media Relations, and Development.  As social scientist, he has worked on the impact of migration on Puerto Rican political behavior, political attitudes and orientations, as well as on issues of racial identity.  A political scientist by training, Dr. Vargas-Ramos is editor of Race, Front and Center: Puerto Rican Perspectives on Race, and co-editor, along with Edwin Meléndez, of Puerto Ricans at the Dawn of the New Millennium. Carlos is also author, among others of “Political Crisis, Migration and Electoral Behavior” CENTRO: The Journal of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies 30(3): 279-312 (2018) and “The role of state actors in Puerto Rico’s long century of migration,” in Anke Birkenmaier, editor Caribbean Migrations: The Legacies of Colonialism (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press) 2020.
     
    Lucia Gómez is the Political Director of the NYC Central Labor Council – AFL-CIO. Prior to joining the NYC CLC, Lucia was the Director of Organizing and Strategic Partnerships for LiUNA Local 78. Lucia has been engaged in census and redistricting work since 1999. She first served as LatinoJustice PRLDEF's East Coast Latino Voting Rights Project Director, and later as a Policy Fellow with the National Institute for Latino Policy.
     
    Juan Cartagena is a constitutional and civil rights attorney who is the President & General Counsel of LatinoJustice PRLDEF, one of the nation’s leading civil rights public interest legal organizations that represents Latinas and Latinos throughout the country and works to increase their entry into the legal profession.  Mr. Cartagena is particularly recognized for his work on the political representation of poor and marginalized communities – especially Puerto Rican and Latino communities.  His publications focus on protecting the voting strength of Latinx voters and his voting rights litigation has taken him to courts in New York, New Jersey, Chicago, Philadelphia, Massachusetts, Florida and New Hampshire. 
     
    Fulvia Vargas-De Leon is an Associate Counsel at LatinoJustice PRLDEF. Her practice focuses on voting rights issues including enfranchisement of individuals formerly incarcerated and language access as well as redistricting. Prior to joining LatinoJustice, she was a Staff Attorney at Bronx Legal Services and the New York Legal Assistance Group where her practice focused on housing, labor and employment and public benefits. Fulvia is a graduate of the Syracuse University College of Law and Lehigh University.
     
    Robert J. Rodriguez was elected to the New York State Assembly in November 2010. He represent the 68th Assembly district. As an Assemblyman, Robert focuses on protecting and creating affordable housing, bringing good jobs into our community and ensuring our children get the quality education they deserve. He is co-chair of the New York State Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment.
     
    Ivelisse Cuevas-Molina is an assistant professor of political science at Fordham University Rose Hill College in the Bronx, where she teaches courses on American politics, political participation, racial and ethnic politics, and Latino Politics. She grew up in Lares, Puerto Rico and received her undergraduate degree from the University of Puerto Rico in Rio Piedras. She currently serves as a non-partisan member of the New York State Independent Redistricting Commission

     

    This event is cosponsored by LatinoJustice PRLDEF


     

    Join the Zoom webinar at :
    https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83392117798?pwd=K3Z4ZUNBNkQ3dDZRdDJmVXIzenpaUT09

     



    Tools


    Redistricting 2020: Challenges to Hispanic Congressional Representation in New York State
    Redistricting 2020: Challenges to HispanicCongressional
    Representation in New York State
    (PDF)

     

     

     

    WHEN
    Liquid error: undefined method `day' for nil:NilClass
    WHERE
    Virtual
    rsvp

  • rsvped for Puerto Rican Women from the Jazz Age 2021-03-10 11:24:08 -0500

    Meet the Author:
    Basilio Serrano-"Puerto Rican Women from the Jazz Age: Stories of Success”

    About the Book

    The topic of this book may seem unusual to some since there may be those who believe that Puerto Rican women may not have entered the jazz milieu during its early history. Nevertheless, an aim of the book is to dispel this and other false generalizations. The contents of this volume documents how Puerto Rican women were not only present in early jazz but how they played trailblazing and innovative roles and contributed to the emergence of the genre in the States and abroad. This work presents information that is confirmable through a variety of sources.

    The book may not be the definitive work on the subject but serves as a starting point to:

    • document the success and achievement of several Puerto Rican women from the jazz age
    • consider the different strategies used for success in jazz and film by women
    • illustrate the evolution of various careers
    • consider the different personal circumstances under which success was achieved
    • consider how women in contemporary jazz and film can learn from their predecessors
    • provide women: older, young, and youthful, examples of success with documentary evidence on how to achieve Book Organization

    The book is organized into sections that cover a brief history of significant Puerto Rican women in music and the performing arts followed by biographical descriptions of pioneering women in jazz and film. Throughout the text there is commentary on the situations facing women, especially, male chauvinism, colonialism, racism, and anti-women prejudice in jazz.

    Every effort was made to include only facts that are easily confirmable. Unsupported tales or questionable events are avoided to ensure that the material contained in the volume can be used for teaching purposes and for curriculum development when credit is given to this work. In the process of developing the central theme of this volume, special effort was made to document those experiences where Puerto Rican women collaborate with members of the African American community to confirm how the cross-cultural collaboration resulted beneficial to both ethnic peoples.

    The book details the many instances where members of the African American community assisted the fledgling Puerto Rican artists achieve success and stardom. Figures such as Helen Elise Smith, David J. Martin, Will Marion Cook, Ada 'Bricktop' Smith, Dr. Laurence Clifton Jones, and other distinguished African Americans are described.

     


    Author: Basilio Serrano, Prof. Emeritus of SUNY College at Old Westbury

    Commentator: Tomas Peña,  Editor-in-Chief, Jazzdelapena.com; Journalist and Contributor

    About the Author

    Basilio Serrano was born in San Sebastián, Puerto Rico. He moved to Brooklyn, New York as a child, where he began attending school and subsequently relocated to the Lower East Side of Manhattan with his family (where he spent most of his youth). He attended City College (CCNY – City University of New York) where he completed his bachelor’s and master’s degrees and went on to receive a PhD from New York University. Dr. Serrano is a professor emeritus and former chair of the Childhood Education Department of the State University of New York – College at Old Westbury.

    In addition to educating teachers, Professor Serrano has served as a curriculum writer specializing in Latin American Studies (LAS). His extensive work in the LAS field has led him to research many facets of the Latin American experience in the United States, in particular, the Puerto Rican Diaspora and the Boricuas’ wide range of experiences in the States.

    In recent years, Dr. Serrano has conducted in-depth investigations into the role of the Puerto Rican in the development of popular music and jazz. The result of this research has been documented in his seminal book on Juan Tizol, and an assortment of other related articles and writings. Moreover, he has written articles on the history of the Puerto Rican community in the United States as well as biographical essays on musicians in the world of jazz. His publications appear in academic journals and magazines published in the United States and Puerto Rico.

    About the Commentator
    Tomas Peña will serve as commentator for this event. Tomas is Editor-in-Chief, journalist, and contributing writer at Jazzdelapena.com. A graduate of Empire State College with a dual major in journalism and Latin American studies, Tomas has spent years applying his knowledge and writing skills to the promotion of great musicians. A specialist in the crossroads between jazz and Latin music, Peña has written extensively on the subject. His writing appears on the Latin Jazz Network; Chamber Music America magazine and numerous other publications.

    6 PM Eastern Time

     

    WHEN
    Liquid error: undefined method `day' for nil:NilClass
    WHERE
    Virtual
    rsvp

connect

get updates

Liquid syntax error: Error in tag 'subpage' - No such page slug site.signup_page